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Posted by on Jul 5, 2013 in Generational | 0 comments

What Does ‘Honor’ Mean?

What Does ‘Honor’ Mean?

The concept of honor is lost on our generation. (tweet this)

The word honor has such a wide variety of meanings, it’s hard to know where to start. Here are just a few from dictionary.reference.com

  • Integrity in one’s beliefs or actions
  • A source of distinction
  • A title of respect
  • The privilege of teeing off first in a hole of golf
  • Having a high trump card in a game of bridge
  • Worship
  • Accepting a method of payment
  • To salute with a bow

It is no wonder people have difficulty understanding and applying honor in relationships! I believe if you can grasp its true meaning, you will find honor much easier to put to practice and you will start receiving its benefits. Practicing honor is one side of the Honor Cycle.

What does honor mean to you?

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Posted by on Jun 28, 2013 in Generational | 0 comments

Father Forgets

Father Forgets

I discovered this poem inserted into Dale Carnegie’s How to win Friends and Influence People. What do you think about what the author is communicating? One of my next posts will be about Blessing, a powerful part of the Honor Cycle. This poem is a great way to introduce the topic.

“Father Forgets” by W. Livingston Larned  [tweet this]

Listen, son; I am saying this as you lie asleep, one little paw crumpled under your cheek and the blond curls stickily wet on your damp forehead. I have stolen into your room alone. Just a few minutes ago, as I sat reading my paper in the library, a stifling wave of remorse swept over me. Guiltily I came to your bedside.

There are things I was thinking, son: I had been cross to you. I scolded you as you were dressing for school because you gave your face merely a dab with a towel. I took you to task for not cleaning your shoes. I called out angrily when you threw some of your things on the floor.

At breakfast I found fault, too. You spilled things. You gulped down your food. You put your elbows on the table. You spread butter too thick on your bread. And as you started off to play and I made for my train, you turned and waved a hand and called, “Goodbye, Daddy!” and I frowned, and said in reply, “Hold your shoulders back!”

Then it began all over again in the late afternoon. As I came Up the road, I spied you, down on your knees, playing marbles. There were holes in your stockings. I humiliated you before you boyfriends by marching you ahead of me to the house. Stockings were expensive – and if you had to buy them you would be more careful! Imagine that, son, form a father!

Do you remember, later, when I was reading in the library, how you came in timidly, with a sort of hurt look in your eyes? When I glanced up over my paper, impatient at the interruption, you hesitated at the door. “What is it you want?” I snapped.

You said nothing, but ran across in one tempestuous plunge, and threw your arms around my neck and kissed me, and your small arms tightened with an affection that God had set blooming in your heart and which even neglect could not wither. And then you were gone, pattering up the stairs.

Well, son, it was shortly afterwards that my paper slipped from my hands and a terrible sickening fear came over me. What has habit been doing to me? The habit of finding fault, of reprimanding – this was my reward to your for being a boy. It was not that I did not love you; it was that I expected too much of youth. I was measuring you by the yardstick of my own years.

And there was so much that was good and fine and true in your character. The little heart of you was as big as the dawn itself over the wide hills. This was shown by your spontaneous impulse to rush in and kiss me good night. Nothing else matters tonight, son. I have come to your bedside in the darkness, and I have knelt there, ashamed!

It is a feeble atonement; I know you would not understand these things if I told them to you during your waking hours. But tomorrow I will be a real daddy! I will chum with you, and suffer when you suffer, and laugh when you laugh. I will bite my tongue when impatient words come. I will keep saying as if it were a ritual: “He is nothing buy a boy – a little boy!”

I am afraid I have visualized you as a man. Yet as I see you now, son, crumpled and weary in your cot, I see that you are still a baby. Yesterday you were in your mother’s arms, your head on her shoulder. I have asked too much, too much.

What do you think about what the author is communicating?

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Posted by on Jun 19, 2013 in Generational, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Getting the Honor Cycle Moving

Getting the Honor Cycle Moving

what is honorDiscovering the Honor Cycle has been a long journey for me. I’ve spent the last fifteen years intentionally growing in the practice of honor. Of course, there are still days where I catch myself wanting to forge my own path. But I’ve seen the advantages of this lifestyle in ways I never could have expected. Here are some questions that can help you get the Honor Cycle moving in your family. (tweet this)

1.)   How do you see your parents’ generation?

Think about it for a minute. Do you see value in the previous generation? Given the chance to build something on your own, would you demand that they come and build with you? Or do you relish the opportunity to stand on your own without their oversight?

2.)   How do you see the next generation?

Does your vision for the future go beyond your life? What are you invested in that will benefit future generations? Are you prepared to come alongside a new generation and empower them to flourish?

3.)   Would you consider a new approach?

What if the Honor Cycle truly does have the power to transform our families and our society? Are you willing to change your lifestyle to take advantage of its power? The Honor Cycle won’t self-initiate, but it only takes one willing person to get it moving in your family. Are you willing to consider a new approach to life and relationships?

Would you like to share your answers to any of these questions?

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Posted by on Jun 12, 2013 in Generational | 0 comments

Six Things You Need to Know about the Honor Cycle

Six Things You Need to Know about the Honor Cycle

My new book, The Honor Cycle, will be released later this summer. It explores how the flow of honor and blessing between generations empowers families and societies to learn from their successes and failures, solve problems together and build a better future for generations to come.

 

The Honor Cycle is initiated by two actions:

1)   Practicing Honor

2)   Releasing Blessing

 

Here are six things you need to know about the Honor Cycle: (tweet this)

1)    Honor Benefits You (tweet this)

Honor is not a cultural formality without relevance. On the contrary, it is hugely rewarding! You may know the 5th Commandment, “Honor your father and mother.” Did you ever notice that it’s the only one of the Ten Commandments that follows with a promise? “Honor your father and mother that it may be well with you.” The practice of honor helps you make the most of your life.

2)    Honor is Probably Not What You Think It Is (tweet this)

Unfortunately, our society has lost touch with the true meaning and purpose of honor. “Honor” has become more about outward expressions of respect, rather than cultivating an internal sense of value for other people. The true meaning of honor is all about placing value on another person.

3)    Honor Benefits Your Parents (tweet this)

You may not know it, but your parents and mentors have emotional needs just like you. One of their greatest needs is to know you value them. When you start practicing honor, they will become much more secure. In fact, you’ll notice them becoming better in their role, which benefits you and keeps the Honor Cycle flowing!

4)    Your Blessing Benefits Your Children (tweet this)

There is no greater power you have as a parent than to release blessing on your children. It shapes their sense of identity and purpose. Your words have the power to change your child’s future, and your blessing is the key to help them receive everything you have to offer. It’s an essential part of the Honor Cycle.

5)    You can Correct Negative Behavior and still Release a Blessing (tweet this)

As a father of young children, I recognize parenting is not about pretending your children are perfect. You have a responsibility to correct negative behavior. These moments, however, can be great opportunities to reinforce the Honor Cycle by taking time to speak a blessing while bringing correction.

6)    Releasing a Blessing is a Supernatural Process (tweet this)

Are you ready to get spiritual? Faith in God will empower you to release blessing on a whole new level. Allowing God to be a part of the process will supercharge the power of the Honor Cycle and multiply your blessing for many generations to come.

What questions do you have about the Honor Cycle?

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Posted by on Jun 10, 2013 in Generational, Uncategorized | 2 comments

How the Honor Cycle Works

How the Honor Cycle Works

what is honorAn ancient Thai tradition illustrates how the Honor Cycle works. In the ceremony of Wai Khru, students pay homage to their teachers to express their gratitude and to formalize the student-teacher relationship. The student honors the teacher, recognizing the role of the teacher and submitting to his instruction. The wai khru chant, which expresses respect for the teachers, ends by asking that the teachers bless their studies.

This tradition demonstrates that the posture of the student is supremely important to facilitate the learning process. The student places value on the teacher and positions himself to receive what the teacher has to offer. But notice that the teacher understands that he must release blessing. Instruction and guidance is only part of the assignment. The real power of the older generation is to bless future generations! (tweet this)

A posture of honor positions us to receive blessing from our parents, teachers and mentors. Giving our blessing to our children, students and mentees empowers them to honor. This is the power of the Honor Cycle. Adhering to these simple principles can restore broken families and societies, setting them up to flourish for many generations.

How have you seen the Honor Cycle working in your relationships?

 

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